Albizu.Apologue

visenyc:

Food and music lovers it is our pleasure to present you with our fifth installment of the “Flavor In Your Ear” series. In these last two years we have brought you an up and coming chef, several ground breaking DJs, and now we bring you the person behind Apt78 and one of the front runners of…

anarchosyndicalism:

Unpaid Internships Must Be Destroyed

Oh, man! This is a great article and issue that I have personally dealt with. I worked two unpaid internships and had to quit one because it was too demanding with my school schedule as well as not receiving any compensation for it.

 I had to pay for transportation and food on my own salary, barely making $125 every two weeks with ANOTHER job I had at my school.  It would cost me $60 a week alone on travel.  My travels entailed taking the metro north from my school in Pleasantville (50 minutes north of Grand Central Station) to NYC ($14.75 peak time) then the subway ($2.50) to get to my internship.  To grab a decent lunch would cost around $5. I worked every Tuesday and Thursday from 9am to 6pm.  I would then repeat those steps to get back to school.  The cost would amount to $80 a week alone.  I’ll be damned if I wanted to grab a couple beers on Thirsty Thursday after work.  If I wanted to save money, I would have to wait to 9pm at my school downtown campus (Pace) to take the free shuttle back home, and arrive at my campus around 10:30pm.  Doing this would save me $30 a week, a huge savings on my account.  Regardless, I still had no money  to account for other expenses that I had. 

Therefore, I highly concur with this article.  All student interns should be paid or at least get bonuses based on performance if they receive academic credit.  We all know some internships are way more demanding than others.  So if interns should give it their best shot at work while taking 16 credits and traveling from 40 minutes away, the LEAST a company can do is compensate their employee.  

theatlantic:

Appetite for War, by Sage Stossel.
Albizu.Apologue turned 1 today!

Albizu.Apologue turned 1 today!

climateadaptation:

Rolling Stone must read of the day.

Goodbye, Miami
By century’s end, rising sea levels will turn the nation’s urban fantasyland into an American Atlantis. But long before the city is completely underwater, chaos will begin
In that past decade, tourist visits had plummeted by 40 percent, even after the Florida legislature agreed to allow casino gambling in a desperate attempt to raise revenue for storm protection. The city of Homestead, in southern Miami-Dade County, which had been flattened by Hurricane Andrew in 1992, had to be completely abandoned. Thousands of tract homes were bulldozed because they were a public health hazard. In the parts of the county that were still inhabitable, only the wealthiest could afford to insure their homes. Mortgages were nearly impossible to get, mostly because banks didn’t believe the homes would be there in 30 years. At high tide, many roads were impassable, even for the most modern semiaquatic vehicles.
Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math
But Hurricane Milo was unexpectedly devastating. Because sea-level­ rise had already pushed the water table so high, it took weeks for the storm waters to recede. Salt water corroded underground wiring, leaving parts of the city dark for months. Drinking-water­ wells were ruined. Interstate 95 was clogged with cars and trucks stuffed with animals and personal belongings, as hundreds of thousands of people fled north to Orlando, the highest ground in central Florida. Developers drew up plans for new buildings on stilts, but few were built. A new flexible carbon-fiber­ bridge was proposed to link Miami Beach with the mainland, but the bankrupt city couldn’t secure financing and the project fell apart. The skyscrapers that had gone up during the Obama years were gradually abandoned and used as staging grounds for drug runners and exotic-animal traffickers. A crocodile nested in the ruins of the Pérez Art Museum.
Read more: Why the City of Miami is doomed to drown

climateadaptation:

Rolling Stone must read of the day.

Goodbye, Miami

By century’s end, rising sea levels will turn the nation’s urban fantasyland into an American Atlantis. But long before the city is completely underwater, chaos will begin

In that past decade, tourist visits had plummeted by 40 percent, even after the Florida legislature agreed to allow casino gambling in a desperate attempt to raise revenue for storm protection. The city of Homestead, in southern Miami-Dade County, which had been flattened by Hurricane Andrew in 1992, had to be completely abandoned. Thousands of tract homes were bulldozed because they were a public health hazard. In the parts of the county that were still inhabitable, only the wealthiest could afford to insure their homes. Mortgages were nearly impossible to get, mostly because banks didn’t believe the homes would be there in 30 years. At high tide, many roads were impassable, even for the most modern semiaquatic vehicles.

Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math

But Hurricane Milo was unexpectedly devastating. Because sea-level­ rise had already pushed the water table so high, it took weeks for the storm waters to recede. Salt water corroded underground wiring, leaving parts of the city dark for months. Drinking-water­ wells were ruined. Interstate 95 was clogged with cars and trucks stuffed with animals and personal belongings, as hundreds of thousands of people fled north to Orlando, the highest ground in central Florida. Developers drew up plans for new buildings on stilts, but few were built. A new flexible carbon-fiber­ bridge was proposed to link Miami Beach with the mainland, but the bankrupt city couldn’t secure financing and the project fell apart. The skyscrapers that had gone up during the Obama years were gradually abandoned and used as staging grounds for drug runners and exotic-animal traffickers. A crocodile nested in the ruins of the Pérez Art Museum.

Read more: Why the City of Miami is doomed to drown

gorgeousammy:

With 1,800 solar panels, the University Hospital in Mirebalais, Haiti, is the world’s largest solar powered hospital, providing 185,000 people with healthcare to which they previously had little access.  Also, by going solar the hospital will be able to generate more energy than it requires, saving about $379,000 per year.

gorgeousammy:

With 1,800 solar panels, the University Hospital in Mirebalais, Haiti, is the world’s largest solar powered hospital, providing 185,000 people with healthcare to which they previously had little access.  Also, by going solar the hospital will be able to generate more energy than it requires, saving about $379,000 per year.

gq:


GQ Rules: The 48-Hour Wardrobe
elizavetaalexandra:

#syria #boston #2013 #notalone #staystrong

elizavetaalexandra:

#syria #boston #2013 #notalone #staystrong

secretrepublic:

Our generation’s expectations of our economic future resemble that of our parents, but our reality more closely resembles that of our grandparents. Every generation believes it will have it better and easier than the generation before it, and for as long as human history has been recorded that…